The critical role of parents

By Ilia L. Likou ,

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SO MUCH TO DO: Nauma Leautuli.

SO MUCH TO DO: Nauma Leautuli.

Every child has the power to succeed.

“As a parent, you are your child’s first and most important teacher,” Nauma Leautuli from Tufutafoe said.

Nauma was approached by the Village Voice team yesterday while on his way to his son’s graduation.

“I’m here to witness my son’s graduation, he’s still staying with one of my relatives here in Upolu,” he said.

Nauma said he had 11 children.

“My eldest stays with my family here and goes to school here as well,” he said. “I always come to see him whenever I have time, no matter how far we are but I always support’s my son’s education here in Upolu.”

How?

“I bake, I sell my handcraft work, I mean this is me all the time and I never rest, I know what the future holds for my children if I’m lazy and sleep all day long,” Nauma said.

“I work on my own to support my children financially, no matter how slow things are on the big island in terms of money, but I never give up.

“And it’s all because I want my children to succeed in life.”

His eldest is 20 years old.

“All my children are all in school and as I’ve mentioned earlier, the time I go to sleep, someone will teach another lesson to my children.

“We all know that when parents and families are involved in their children’s schools, the children do better and have better feelings about going to school. 

 “There are many ways that parents can support their children’s learning at home and throughout the school year.

“Even though my son is staying with my family here, I always pray and work knowing that God is in control of everything.

“The lesson I teach them every day is to try their best, nothing comes easy, they have to put in all their strength and efforts in what they’re doing and they’ll see their dream come true in the future.”

Taking responsibility and working independently are important qualities for school success. 

“We can help our children to develop by establishing reasonable rules for them to follow and making it clear to them that they have to take responsibility for their actions both at home and at school.

“That’s love!

 “I mean showing your child how to break a job down into small steps, and monitor what your child does after school in the evenings and on weekends. 

“What they’re watching on social media, television is very important.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

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