An eye opener for returning Samoan

By Ulimasao Fata ,

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TAKE CHANGE WITH CAUTION: Masefau Mose of Tuana’i.

TAKE CHANGE WITH CAUTION: Masefau Mose of Tuana’i. (Photo: Ulimasao Fata)

Coming back from New Zealand to Samoa has been an eye opener for Masefau Mose of Tuana’i.

Since he left with his family in 2012, he said Samoa has undergone a number of changes. There are positive ones. 

But the negative changes, especially with the attitude of young people, is what shocks him.

“The most disturbing one to me I have seen around is the kids not knowing their roles and their place within their families,” he said.

“It has also surprised me about the number of dropouts from schools. You see them lounging on the buses every day, wasting time.”

Masefau said these are sad signs for Samoa. 

And he believes something should be done to change them.

Home and the role of parents are critical if this is to happen.

 “I guess parents nowadays are just busy spoiling their children,” he said.

“Some of them are busy working while forgetting to bond and talk with their children. 

“Another reason is that parents are just careless, they are just doing what they want instead of sharing and talking to their children about how things should be.”

Masefau said parents should also open their eyes to the impact of the internet and technology on the behaviour of young people.

 “We need to remind them about the Bible,” he said, “send them to Sunday school. That’s the basics and that’s where they need to be.

“Technology nowadays is just taking their time instead of the Bible and school text books.

Masefau added that children nowadays are talking back to their parents.

Some of them have started to question their parents, which he said is very disrespectful.

“There is so much happening with the children nowadays,” he said.

“Some are just disrespecting their own parents and do not appreciate their parents at all.

“So I just want to encourage all the parents out there, teach them about the Bible and the gospel because that’s the best way to shape their lives.

“We have to teach them while they are young so that when they grow up they will not turn from it.”

Masefau concluded that Samoa has to got to be careful about the changes it allows.

“There’s good and bad. The bad ones are the visible ones.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

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